Practice Tips

  • Tip of the Week #12

    Don’t forget to check homeowner’s policies for a one or two-year time to sue limitations. Depending on the circumstances, these provisions are valid and shorten the normal five-year contract SOL.
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  • Tip of the Week #11

    Let your clients know they may be followed by a private investigator with a camera–a few seconds of video can torpedo an otherwise good case.
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  • Tip of the Week #10

    Remember a homeowners’ policy’s liability coverage is not limited to incidents occurring on the insured’s premises.
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  • Tip of the Week #9

    Always find out if the adverse driver in an auto wreck case was "on-the-job." Company defendants usually have higher liability limits which may translate into a more complete financial recovery.
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  • Tip of the Week #8

    A named insured or resident family member does not have to be in the "insured vehicle" for UM to apply. They are covered when in another vehicle or even when "sitting on their porch swing" as long as they are entitled to to recover from the "owner or operator" of an unisured (or underinsured) vehicle or hit-and-run vehicle.
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  • Tip of the Week #7

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  • Tip of the Week #6

    Consider filing suit as soon as you take a case rather than waiting for negotiations to break down with a low ball offer from an adjuster; by the time your client finishes treatment, defense counsel has earned his fees and trial deadlines can encourage settlement offers.
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  • Tip of the Week #5

    Be sure to do a search for medical liens against your clients BI recovery before disbursing funds. The Supreme Court has ruled you owe an ethical obligation to be sure those liens are satisfied.
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  • Tip of the Week #4

    It may be possible to salvage a blown SOL in a state with a longer limitations period than Oklahoma's. I have saved more than one attorney from a malpractice suit in this way. Of course, you have to have a defendant amenable to personal jurisdiction in the state with the longer SOL. Sometimes, however, you can get away with having a defendant who doesn't understand jurisdiction and shows up and defends in the other state without raising a jurisdictional problem.
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  • Tip of the Week #3

    It may be possible to salvage a blown SOL in a state with a longer limitations period than Oklahoma's. I have saved more than one attorney from a malpractice suit in this way. Of course, you have to have a defendant amenable to personal jurisdiction in the state with the longer SOL. Sometimes, however, you can get away with having a defendant who doesn't understand jurisdiction and shows up and defends in the other state without raising a jurisdictional problem.
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